Bright Future Wealth

Bright Future Wealth
Bright Future Wealth
Bright Future Wealth
Bright Future Wealth

The following article examines what would be the largest wealth gains in U.S. history during this global financial boom and how they might impact on the overall economic future of U.S. society.

The Great Recession began in 2007 when Lehman Brothers bought a minority stake in JPMorgan, the nation’s largest bank. The banks experienced great success, achieving market capitalization of $10 trillion in 2008 and 2012. The Great Recession began during the crisis in 2008 when the U.S. economy collapsed following the credit downgrade of the U.S. government and the U.S. dollar weakened for over half a year—at a time when the U.S. economy was struggling under international pressure, inflation was at a record low, and the dollar was suffering unprecedented losses. There were many short-term fluctuations from the short-term economic downturn as well; however, the large number of short-term fluctuations were not attributable to a single financial crisis (they were probably the result of a combination of one or more technical factors).[8] The Bank of Japan had been conducting quantitative easing (QE) since 2001. QE led many to speculate that the U.S. would not suffer a recession and would become a major global financial hub, thereby reducing the overall size of the U.S. economy and causing the U.S. to become increasingly dependent upon foreign banks and foreign currencies. This speculation became the dominant reason

Bright Future Wealth

Bright Future Wealth
Bright Future Wealth
Bright Future Wealth
Bright Future Wealth

The following article examines what would be the largest wealth gains in U.S. history during this global financial boom and how they might impact on the overall economic future of U.S. society.

The Great Recession began in 2007 when Lehman Brothers bought a minority stake in JPMorgan, the nation’s largest bank. The banks experienced great success, achieving market capitalization of $10 trillion in 2008 and 2012. The Great Recession began during the crisis in 2008 when the U.S. economy collapsed following the credit downgrade of the U.S. government and the U.S. dollar weakened for over half a year—at a time when the U.S. economy was struggling under international pressure, inflation was at a record low, and the dollar was suffering unprecedented losses. There were many short-term fluctuations from the short-term economic downturn as well; however, the large number of short-term fluctuations were not attributable to a single financial crisis (they were probably the result of a combination of one or more technical factors).[8] The Bank of Japan had been conducting quantitative easing (QE) since 2001. QE led many to speculate that the U.S. would not suffer a recession and would become a major global financial hub, thereby reducing the overall size of the U.S. economy and causing the U.S. to become increasingly dependent upon foreign banks and foreign currencies. This speculation became the dominant reason